Gabriel Filippelli named 2015 Fellow for International Association of GeoChemistry

Release Date: 
Jul 22 2015

The International Association of GeoChemistry (IAGC) named Gabriel Filippelli, professor of earth sciences, a 2015 IAGC Fellow. This honorary title is bestowed annually to up to Filippelli
two scientists who have made significant contributions to the field of geochemistry. Filippelli was the only Fellow named for 2015.

Filippelli joined the Department of Earth Sciences at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) in 1994. He is recognized as an international authority in the interdisciplinary field of earth sciences and human health.

The IAGC fellow announcement noted: “His work on environmental lead exposure and blood lead levels in children in urban areas has been innovative and transformative.”

Filippelli has traveled the world researching climate change and a host of environmental issues. He has served as a science advisor to the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, a longstanding research effort that studies the history of the Earth recorded in sediments and rocks beneath the sea floor.

“Dr. Filippelli has played a crucial role in building the department’s excellence in geochemistry and strengthening the School’s commitment to geochemistry research, and this award is a true testimony to the quality and impact of his work,” said Kevin Mandernack, chair of the School’s Department of Earth Sciences.

As director of the Center for Urban Health, Filippelli has engaged both academics and the public in recognizing the link between urban environmental issues, public health, and sustainable cities. The Center for Urban Health is a collaboration linking the School of Science, the School of Liberal Arts, the School of Medicine and the Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health.

Filippelli is a former United States Department of State Jefferson Science Fellow. He received his B.S. from the University of California, Davis, and his Ph.D. at the University of California, Santa Cruz in 1994. Gabe spent the early portion of his career investigating the past and present global biogeochemical cycle of phosphorus, and continues to work on important paleo-oceanographic questions relating to climate change and elemental cycling.