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Pollution-related disease presents global environmental challenge

  • Lessons from corals about environmental change: past, present & future

  • What's in your bag? Kathy Licht packs for survival and cool research

    Kathy Licht has conducted field research in Antarctica for almost 25 years, first as a geological sciences graduate student at the University of Colorado and now as an associate professor of earth science at IUPUI.

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    IUPUI researcher weighs in on fairy circles of Namibia

    INDIANAPOLIS -- Numbering in the millions, the so-called fairy circles are in the eastern, interior margin of the coastal Namib Desert, stretching from southern Angola to northern South Africa. They range in size from about 12 feet to about 114 feet, consisting of bare patches of soil surrounded by rings of grass. The origins of the circles have long been debated by researchers. 

    How bacteria hunt other bacteria

    INDIANAPOLIS -- A study published March 28 in Biophysical Journal sheds light on this question, revealing that the bacterial predator Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus (BV) homes in on its target by taking advantage of fluid forces generated by its own swimming movements and those of its prey. These hydrodynamic flow fields bring the bacteria in close proximity, giving BV a greater chance of successful attack.

    NSF-funded IUPUI study of non-rainfall water in Namib Desert reveals unexpected origins

    INDIANAPOLIS -- In a study conducted in one of the world's oldest and most biologically diverse deserts, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis scientists explore the origins of water other than rainfall and are identifying multiple origins. The study, supported by the National Science Foundation, is the first to report that the ocean is not the sole source of life-sustaining fog and dew for numerous plants and animals living in the Namib Desert. 

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